Walking the Fine Line Between Authenticity and Hypocrisy



There is a fine line between authenticity and hypocrisy. It’s important to be aware of what you are communicating in order to make sure you achieve the best results. My guest this week is Ed DeCosta, a powerful executive coach and an engaging keynote speaker here to offer some important pieces of information on how to make sure you always deliver authentic messages.

On today’s podcast:

  • The quest for authenticity
  • Always defend your point of view
  • If you permit hypocrisy, you promote it
  • Steer clear of acquiescing

Links:

The quest for authenticity

One of the foundations of successful leadership is being authentic.

Authenticity is about being real, honest, truthful. The opposite of that is being false, dishonest. A hypocrite is someone who says one thing and does another.

One of the goals of our communications is to evoke emotion.

Sometimes your politeness can be misinterpreted. The same goes for silence.

Always defend your point of view

Situational awareness is extremely important. You should ask yourself:

  • What’s going on?
  • Where am I?
  • Who am I?
  • What is my role? What am I supposed to do?

If somebody confronts you and says, “I believe this about an issue you talk about”, this is a situation where it’s socially acceptable to share your view.

If you don’t share your opinion, and you pretend that you agree, that’s a sign of hypocrisy. You have an opportunity to defend your point of view, but you choose not to.

If you permit hypocrisy, you promote it

If someone behaves out of alignment of what they say their values are, they are perpetuating hypocrisy.

If you permit someone’s hypocrisy, you promote it as well.

Self-leadership is vital. You have to be honest with yourself. You have to realize that you’re either being honest, or you’re not.

Steer clear of acquiescing

Have values you actually believe in. Do whatever exercises you need to do to sink those values deeply into your fabric, your soul. Too many people acquiesce. They don’t say what they were thinking because they believe it wouldn’t have been appropriate. Then they’re full of regret and remorse.


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